Rachel Walzer

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Long ago, high up in the misty mountains, there lived a young girl who could never stop laughing. She laughed when the rain came down. She laughed when the frogs laid eggs. She laughed when she had the flu.
This laughing girl had a cousin who lived far away in the desert. Now this cousin was a muscular young woman, who cried at every strike of the clock. She cried when she ate her scrambled eggs, she cried when she heard a duck quack and she cried when getting ready to meet the next-door neighbor’s son to engage in mind-blowing sex behind the barn.
This next-door neighbor’s son had a mother who was a lawyer. The lawyer was ashamed of her good-for-nothing, hormone-driven son.
The lawyer secretly hired a mysterious woman on a motorcycle to abduct her lazy son and lock him up in a high tower in a polluted city with his dotty old grandmother, who was sure to smack some sense into him and get him on the straight and narrow path.
Unbeknownst to the lawyer, the dotty old grandmother was germaphobe. The moment germaphobic granny set her eyes on her good-for-nothing grandson, she got out her sterile whip and put him to work scrubbing the toilet with a toothbrush.
There are many more characters in this story, which is full of intrigue, mystery, passion, comedy and sin. But it’s too much trouble to write it all out.
In a nutshell, the common denominator for these characters is they all thought they could change each other and others.
Also they were all either directed, performed or created by Rachel, who has worked as a stage director, stage actress, and voice actress for many moons. Rachel’s motto for characters on stage: Own who you are. Play to your fullest. On stage you can be selfish and cruel. You can hurt others. You can judge and slander.
Offstage, don’t do any of the above.
And they all lived crazily ever after.
Long ago, high up in the misty mountains, there lived a young girl who could never stop laughing. She laughed when the rain came down. She laughed when the frogs laid eggs. She laughed when she had the flu.
This laughing girl had a cousin who lived far away in the desert. Now this cousin was a muscular young woman, who cried at every strike of the clock. She cried when she ate her scrambled eggs, she cried when she heard a duck quack and she cried when getting ready to meet the next-door neighbor’s son to engage in mind-blowing sex behind the barn.
This next-door neighbor’s son had a mother who was a lawyer. The lawyer was ashamed of her good-for-nothing, hormone-driven son.
The lawyer secretly hired a mysterious woman on a motorcycle to abduct her lazy son and lock him up in a high tower in a polluted city with his dotty old grandmother, who was sure to smack some sense into him and get him on the straight and narrow path.
Unbeknownst to the lawyer, the dotty old grandmother was germaphobe. The moment germaphobic granny set her eyes on her good-for-nothing grandson, she got out her sterile whip and put him to work scrubbing the toilet with a toothbrush.
There are many more characters in this story, which is full of intrigue, mystery, passion, comedy and sin. But it’s too much trouble to write it all out.
In a nutshell, the common denominator for these characters is they all thought they could change each other and others.
Also they were all either directed, performed or created by Rachel, who has worked as a stage director, stage actress, and voice actress for many moons. Rachel’s motto for characters on stage: Own who you are. Play to your fullest. On stage you can be selfish and cruel. You can hurt others. You can judge and slander.
Offstage, don’t do any of the above.
And they all lived crazily ever after.